50 William Shakespeare Quotes From The Merchant Of Venice

50 William Shakespeare Quotes From The Merchant Of Venice
William Shakespeare (1564–1616) by Books18 is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

William Shakespeare was a renowned English poet, playwright, and actor born in 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon. He has become the most famous and influential author in English literature. Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and nicknamed the Bard of Avon. Shakespeare produced most of his known works between 1589 and 1613. He wrote about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, of which the authorship of some is uncertain. Shakespeare’s writing developed and evolved throughout his career. Scholars often divide his work into periods based on different aspects of his writing style.

He died within a month of signing his will, a document which he begins by describing himself as being in “perfect health”. In his will, Shakespeare left the bulk of his large estate to his elder daughter Susanna. Shakespeare was buried in the chancel of the Holy Trinity Church two days after his death. He retired from writing in 1613 and died three years later at the age of fifty-two. Most of his works were published posthumously in 1623. Shakespeare’s plays remain highly popular today and are constantly studied, performed, and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world.

Quotes From The Merchant Of Venice

“The Goodwins, I think they call the place; a very dangerous flat, and fatal, where the carcasses of many a tall ship lie buried.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 3, sc. 1, l. [4]

“How all the other passions fleet to air,

As doubtful thoughts, and rash-embrac’d despair, And shuddering fear, and green-ey’d jealousy.”

The Merchant of Venice, III, ii, 108

“How like a fawning publican he looks!

I hate him for he is a Christian.”

The Merchant of Venice, I, iii, 42

“My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,

Nor to one place.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, i, 42
“The villainy you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.”

“Look, how the floor of heaven

Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 58

“Thus when I shun Scylla, your father, I fall into Charybdis, your mother.”

The Merchant of Venice, III, v, 17

“O father Abram! what these Christians are,

Whose own hard dealing teaches them suspect the thoughts of others.”

The Merchant of Venice, I, iii, 161

“Thou call’dst me dog before thou hadst a cause, But, since I am a dog, beware my fangs.”

The Merchant of Venice, III, iii, 6
“The seeming truth which cunning times put on to entrap the wisest.”

“Nature hath fram’d strange fellows in her time.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, i, 51

“Who riseth from a feast With that keen appetite that he sits down?”

The Merchant of Venice, II, vi, 8

“I am Sir Oracle,

And when I open my lips let no dog bark!”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 1, l. 93

“Some there be that shadows kiss;

Such have but a shadow’s bliss.”

The Merchant of Venice, II, ix, 66
“I like not fair terms and a villain’s mind.”

“O heavens! this is my true-begotten father.”

The Merchant of Venice, II, ii, 36

“When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, ii, 93

“I never knew so young a body with so old a head.”

The Merchant of Venice, IV, i, 163

“How many things by season season’d are To their right praise and true perfection!”

The Merchant of Venice, V, i, 107
“The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps o’er a cold decree.”

“How much more elder art thou than thy looks!”

The Merchant of Venice, IV, i, 251

“Madam, you have bereft me of all words, Only my blood speaks to you in my veins,”

The Merchant of Venice: By William Shakespear (ed. 1750)

“How far that little candle throws his beams!

So shines a good deed in a naughty world.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 90

“Fish not, with this melancholy bait,

For this fool-gudgeon, this opinion.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, i, 101
“Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer.”

“God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, ii, 59

“What’s here? the portrait of a blinking idiot

Presenting me a schedule!”

The Merchant of Venice (1605)

“I am a tainted wether of the flock,

Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit

Drops earliest to the ground.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. 114

“In sooth I know not why I am so sad:

It wearies me; you say it wearies you.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1
“So may the outward shows be least themselves: The world is still deceived with ornament.”

“Some men there are love not a gaping pig;

Some, that are mad if they behold a cat.”

The Merchant of Venice, IV, i, 47

“Wrest once the law to your authority:

To do a great right, do a little wrong.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. [215]

“All that glisters is not gold—

Often have you heard that told.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596)

“I’ll seal to such a bond,

And say there is much kindness in the Jew.”

The Merchant of Venice, I, iii, 153
“I will not jump with common spirits and rank me with the barbarous multitude.”

“I do know of these,

That therefore only are reputed wise

For saying nothing.”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, i, 95

“Here are a few of the unpleasant’st words

That ever blotted paper.”

The Merchant of Venice, III, ii, 252

“I would not have given it for a wilderness of monkeys.”

The Merchant of Venice, III, i, 130

“A Daniel, still say I; a second Daniel!

I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.”

The Merchant of Venice, IV, i, 341
“They are as sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.”

“In Belmont is a lady richly left,

And she is fair, and fairer than the word,

Of wondrous virtues.”

The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 1, l. [162]

“It is a wise father that knows his own child.”

The Merchant of Venice, II, ii, 83

“What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?”

The Merchant of Venice, IV, i, 69

“But love is blind, and lovers cannot see The pretty follies that themselves commit.”

The Merchant of Venice, II, vi, 36
“There is no vice so simple, but assumes some mark of virtue on his outward parts.”

“And the vile squealing of the wry-neck’d fife.”

The Merchant of Venice, II, v, 30

“This night methinks is but the daylight sick.”

The Merchant of Venice, V, i, 124

“Shall I bend low, and in a bondman’s key,

With bated breath, and whispering humbleness,

Say this.”

The Merchant of Venice, I, iii, 124

“Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?”

The Merchant of Venice [1596-1597], I, i, 83
“You have too much respect upon the world: They lose it that do buy it with much care.”

If you liked our selection of 50 William Shakespeare quotes from The Merchant Of Venice, then perhaps you would also enjoy our collection of 50 Famous William Shakespeare Quotes From Macbeth.

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2 thoughts on “50 William Shakespeare Quotes From The Merchant Of Venice

  1. Wow, wonderful quotes from “Merchant Of Venice”. I love your layout with pictures and quotes mixed together. It is beautiful.

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